Diangelo dating

In my FREE Dating Tips Newsletter, You’ll Learn things: How to attract BEAUTIFUL women and stand out from the competition; An easy, effective way to tell if she’s ready to be kissed so you won’t get rejected; Secrets to naturally approaching women, starting conversations and getting dates; How to get over your fear of rejection – no matter how unsuccessful you’ve been in the past D’Angelo Russell has not been previously engaged. We are currently in process of looking up information on the previous dates and hookups. Online rumors of D’Angelo Russells’s dating past may vary. While it’s relatively simple to find out who’s dating D’Angelo Russell, it’s harder to keep track of all his flings, hookups and breakups. 12 September 2020... Beverly D'Angelo news, gossip, photos of Beverly D'Angelo, biography, Beverly D'Angelo boyfriend list 2016. Relationship history. Beverly D'Angelo relationship list. Beverly D'Angelo dating history, 2020, 2019, list of Beverly D'Angelo relationships. D’Angelo Castro’s Girlfriend. D’Angelo Castro is single. He is not dating anyone currently. D’Angelo had at least 1 relationship in the past. D’Angelo Castro has not been previously engaged. He has a younger sister named Ruby who was also on AGT season 8. According to our records, he has no children. Who is Mike D. Angelo dating? Mike D. Angelo is currently single, according to our records.. The American Pop Singer was born in Thailand on December 19, 1989. Pirat Nitipaisalkul, better known as Mike D. Angelo, is a singer and actor who rose to fame as a member of the the duo Golf & Mike with his brother Pichaya Nitipaisankul. David DeAngelo, real name Eben Pagan, is the man behind “Double Your Dating” – a series of informational products on how to single men become masters of seduction. We really wanted to like “Double Your Dating,” because we believe one of the big sociological problems of our age is that the sexes can’t understand each other. White fragility might have stayed in academia if Brendan Kiley, writing for the Seattle alt-weekly the Stranger, hadn’t applied the term in a 2014 essay about yellowface casting in a local ... Mike D. Angelo’s Girlfriend. Mike D. Angelo is single. He is not dating anyone currently. Mike had at least 1 relationship in the past. Mike D. Angelo has not been previously engaged. He has three older brothers named Pisut, Piset, and Pichaya and a younger sister named Ploychompoo. He had a son named Maxwell with ex-girlfriend Sara Casinghini. You’ll learn things like how to attract BEAUTIFUL women and stand out from the competition. An easy, effective way to tell if she’s ready to be kissed so you won’t get rejected. Secrets to naturally approaching women, starting conversations, dating advice and getting dates. How to get over your fear of rejection – no matter how unsuccessful you’ve been in the past. White supremacists are recruiting white teens online. Parents must stop them. Podcast: Tips for talking about race with small children. Why Aren’t White Mothers Being Blamed for the Opioid Crisis Like Blacks Mothers…

The Wages of Woke - How Robin DiAngelo got rich peddling 'white fragility' - Charles Fain Lehman (Washington Free Beacon) 25 July 2020

2020.07.26 15:14 finnagains The Wages of Woke - How Robin DiAngelo got rich peddling 'white fragility' - Charles Fain Lehman (Washington Free Beacon) 25 July 2020

Dr. Robin DiAngelo, the bestselling author of White Fragility, claims to believe in accountability. DiAngelo used to list the "racial justice" organizations she donates to as part of her extensive "accountability statement," including a monthly "land rent" paid to the Native American tribe that used to occupy Seattle.
But when the Washington Free Beacon began contacting the organizations she listed as recipients of her largesse, DiAngelo scrubbed the site, removing their names and the dates of her giving from the public domain—a version of the page remains available through the Internet Archive after briefly being unavailable due to what the site said were technical issues. The page was edited again as recently as Friday, when DiAngelo wrote she would begin donating 15 percent of her after-tax income, "in cash and in-kind donations," starting next month—suggesting she had not previously, as the page exhorts, given a percentage of her income large enough that she could "feel it."
This about-face is odd for a woman who has made her career demanding white people not respond defensively in hard conversations. DiAngelo vaulted to superstardom upon the 2018 publication of her book, White Fragility, which argues that all whites are racist and any rejection of that fact is only further evidence of it. To address racism, DiAngelo argues, requires the sort of anti-bias instruction she is selling.
The nationwide racial outcry that has followed the killing of George Floyd has supercharged the Diversity and Inclusion industry, and DiAngelo may be its greatest success story. While she has likely made over $2 million from her book, the speaking circuit is where she is cleaning up. One of the speakers bureaus that represents her told the Free Beacon that a 60-90 minute keynote would run $30,000, a two-hour workshop $35,000, and a half-day event $40,000.
Even before the George Floyd protests reinvigorated demand for so-called anti-racist instruction, the New Yorker had dubbed DiAngelo "the country’s most visible expert in anti-bias training." But the eye-popping numbers underscore how she has turned her academic theories about white racism into a multimillion-dollar empire of anti-imperialism. She owns three homes and is an international jetsetter.
DiAngelo did not respond to multiple requests for comment for this article.
DiAngelo’s clients, according to her website, range from Amazon and the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation to Unilever and the YMCA. DiAngelo reportedly charges up to $15,000 per session—a March 2019 appearance, for example, cost the University of Kentucky $12,000, as well as a $5-a-minute phone-call fee. Recent virtual events run up to $175 a ticket. The eight to ten private events DiAngelo says she speaks at each month likely net her at least $1.5 million annually.
Her book, which made the New York Times bestseller list in its first week and currently occupies the number-two slot, has only added to her success. DiAngelo's publisher said it has sold 1.6 million copies, one million this year alone. Given a conservative 8 percent in royalties, that would mean the book has made DiAngelo over $2 million.
Such lucrative gigs put the white DiAngelo on par with several prominent black commentators on race. Boston University's Ibram X. Kendi, whose book has jockeyed with DiAngelo's on the bestseller list, charges $150 for tickets to public events and $25,000 for a one-hour presentation, his representatives told the Free Beacon. Former Atlantic writer Ta-Nehisi Coates has charged between $30,000 and $40,000 for public lectures.
DiAngelo has presented herself as a classic American rags-to-riches story, offering vivid details of a childhood spent in profound poverty. Those details are not always consistent—in a 2006 paper, for example, DiAngelo claims she "left home as a teenager and struggled to survive," seeing "no path out of poverty other than education." But in a recent New York Times interview, DiAngelo claimed to have run away from home but says she "didn’t get far," and she didn’t enroll in college until she was in her mid-30s. Neither of DiAngelo’s sisters responded to requests for comment.
Her path out of poverty did come through education: a B.A. from Seattle University, then an M.A. and Ph.D. from the University of Washington. The latter was collected under the tutelage of Professor James A. Banks, the "father" of multicultural education, and earned for a 300-page thesis on the "master discourses" of whiteness.
By the time DiAngelo landed an associate professorship at Westfield State University, outside of Springfield, Mass., she was entrenched in anti-bias training. As early as 2007, she co-taught a class with Darlene Flynn, a leading figure in Seattle's social justice community.
She may have seen opportunity in a growing industry. The Diversity and Inclusion business was thought to be worth $8 billion as of 2003; by 2005, 65 percent of big companies offered diversity training.
Demand has risen since, and she has reaped the benefits. Public records indicate she owns three homes, all bought before White Fragility was published: a four-bedroom bungalow and half of a duplex in Seattle (her daughter, nearing 40, occupies the latter), and a cabin in rural Washington, where DiAngelo and husband Jason Toews relax with friends who, at least on Toews's Instagram, appear to be exclusively white. Tax assessments put DiAngelo's cumulative housing wealth at roughly $1.6 million, in the vicinity of Coates's $2 million Brooklyn brownstone.
In the past three years, DiAngelo and Toews, who as of last September served as DiAngelo’s administrative assistant, have backpacked through Thailand, visited Romania, and toured South Africa.
DiAngelo’s wealth is jarring in part because of her criticisms of white privilege. It is also surprising given that available evidence suggests the anti-bias training she peddles does not work.
A review of nearly 1,000 studies of anti-bias tools found little evidence that they have any impact. In fact, recent studies suggest anti-bias training's primary effect may be to encourage discrimination: Firms with diversity training end up with fewer minorities in management, and field research finds that training both reinforces stereotypes and increases animosity against minority groups.
But DiAngelo’s concept of "white fragility" offers an answer to that academic evidence: The negative responses whites express when told they’re racist are simply evidence that they lack "racial stamina"—and indicate that more $40,000 anti-bias sessions are necessary.
Her advice to white people looking to "shift their thinking and alter their actions" is to engage in more self-education, particularly of the sort she sells. Doing so, she told NPR, "will be lifelong"—an effective way for an already wealthy woman to keep her clientele.
This sales pitch is working. White Fragility tops reading lists from corporations and prestigious universities. Reading groups from Washington, D.C., to South Euclid, Ohio, are discussing it. And the proceeds all flow to a woman who has made a career arguing that white people like her are inescapably, intolerably privileged—an injustice you can only remedy by buying her book.
https://freebeacon.com/culture/the-wages-of-woke-2/
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2020.07.26 15:13 finnagains The Wages of Woke - How Robin DiAngelo got rich peddling 'white fragility' - Charles Fain Lehman (Washington Free Beacon) 25 July 2020

Dr. Robin DiAngelo, the bestselling author of White Fragility, claims to believe in accountability. DiAngelo used to list the "racial justice" organizations she donates to as part of her extensive "accountability statement," including a monthly "land rent" paid to the Native American tribe that used to occupy Seattle.
But when the Washington Free Beacon began contacting the organizations she listed as recipients of her largesse, DiAngelo scrubbed the site, removing their names and the dates of her giving from the public domain—a version of the page remains available through the Internet Archive after briefly being unavailable due to what the site said were technical issues. The page was edited again as recently as Friday, when DiAngelo wrote she would begin donating 15 percent of her after-tax income, "in cash and in-kind donations," starting next month—suggesting she had not previously, as the page exhorts, given a percentage of her income large enough that she could "feel it."
This about-face is odd for a woman who has made her career demanding white people not respond defensively in hard conversations. DiAngelo vaulted to superstardom upon the 2018 publication of her book, White Fragility, which argues that all whites are racist and any rejection of that fact is only further evidence of it. To address racism, DiAngelo argues, requires the sort of anti-bias instruction she is selling.
The nationwide racial outcry that has followed the killing of George Floyd has supercharged the Diversity and Inclusion industry, and DiAngelo may be its greatest success story. While she has likely made over $2 million from her book, the speaking circuit is where she is cleaning up. One of the speakers bureaus that represents her told the Free Beacon that a 60-90 minute keynote would run $30,000, a two-hour workshop $35,000, and a half-day event $40,000.
Even before the George Floyd protests reinvigorated demand for so-called anti-racist instruction, the New Yorker had dubbed DiAngelo "the country’s most visible expert in anti-bias training." But the eye-popping numbers underscore how she has turned her academic theories about white racism into a multimillion-dollar empire of anti-imperialism. She owns three homes and is an international jetsetter.
DiAngelo did not respond to multiple requests for comment for this article.
DiAngelo’s clients, according to her website, range from Amazon and the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation to Unilever and the YMCA. DiAngelo reportedly charges up to $15,000 per session—a March 2019 appearance, for example, cost the University of Kentucky $12,000, as well as a $5-a-minute phone-call fee. Recent virtual events run up to $175 a ticket. The eight to ten private events DiAngelo says she speaks at each month likely net her at least $1.5 million annually.
Her book, which made the New York Times bestseller list in its first week and currently occupies the number-two slot, has only added to her success. DiAngelo's publisher said it has sold 1.6 million copies, one million this year alone. Given a conservative 8 percent in royalties, that would mean the book has made DiAngelo over $2 million.
Such lucrative gigs put the white DiAngelo on par with several prominent black commentators on race. Boston University's Ibram X. Kendi, whose book has jockeyed with DiAngelo's on the bestseller list, charges $150 for tickets to public events and $25,000 for a one-hour presentation, his representatives told the Free Beacon. Former Atlantic writer Ta-Nehisi Coates has charged between $30,000 and $40,000 for public lectures.
DiAngelo has presented herself as a classic American rags-to-riches story, offering vivid details of a childhood spent in profound poverty. Those details are not always consistent—in a 2006 paper, for example, DiAngelo claims she "left home as a teenager and struggled to survive," seeing "no path out of poverty other than education." But in a recent New York Times interview, DiAngelo claimed to have run away from home but says she "didn’t get far," and she didn’t enroll in college until she was in her mid-30s. Neither of DiAngelo’s sisters responded to requests for comment.
Her path out of poverty did come through education: a B.A. from Seattle University, then an M.A. and Ph.D. from the University of Washington. The latter was collected under the tutelage of Professor James A. Banks, the "father" of multicultural education, and earned for a 300-page thesis on the "master discourses" of whiteness.
By the time DiAngelo landed an associate professorship at Westfield State University, outside of Springfield, Mass., she was entrenched in anti-bias training. As early as 2007, she co-taught a class with Darlene Flynn, a leading figure in Seattle's social justice community.
She may have seen opportunity in a growing industry. The Diversity and Inclusion business was thought to be worth $8 billion as of 2003; by 2005, 65 percent of big companies offered diversity training.
Demand has risen since, and she has reaped the benefits. Public records indicate she owns three homes, all bought before White Fragility was published: a four-bedroom bungalow and half of a duplex in Seattle (her daughter, nearing 40, occupies the latter), and a cabin in rural Washington, where DiAngelo and husband Jason Toews relax with friends who, at least on Toews's Instagram, appear to be exclusively white. Tax assessments put DiAngelo's cumulative housing wealth at roughly $1.6 million, in the vicinity of Coates's $2 million Brooklyn brownstone.
In the past three years, DiAngelo and Toews, who as of last September served as DiAngelo’s administrative assistant, have backpacked through Thailand, visited Romania, and toured South Africa.
DiAngelo’s wealth is jarring in part because of her criticisms of white privilege. It is also surprising given that available evidence suggests the anti-bias training she peddles does not work.
A review of nearly 1,000 studies of anti-bias tools found little evidence that they have any impact. In fact, recent studies suggest anti-bias training's primary effect may be to encourage discrimination: Firms with diversity training end up with fewer minorities in management, and field research finds that training both reinforces stereotypes and increases animosity against minority groups.
But DiAngelo’s concept of "white fragility" offers an answer to that academic evidence: The negative responses whites express when told they’re racist are simply evidence that they lack "racial stamina"—and indicate that more $40,000 anti-bias sessions are necessary.
Her advice to white people looking to "shift their thinking and alter their actions" is to engage in more self-education, particularly of the sort she sells. Doing so, she told NPR, "will be lifelong"—an effective way for an already wealthy woman to keep her clientele.
This sales pitch is working. White Fragility tops reading lists from corporations and prestigious universities. Reading groups from Washington, D.C., to South Euclid, Ohio, are discussing it. And the proceeds all flow to a woman who has made a career arguing that white people like her are inescapably, intolerably privileged—an injustice you can only remedy by buying her book.
https://freebeacon.com/culture/the-wages-of-woke-2/
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2020.07.26 15:10 finnagains The Wages of Woke - How Robin DiAngelo got rich peddling 'white fragility' - Charles Fain Lehman (Washington Free Beacon) 25 July 2020

Dr. Robin DiAngelo, the bestselling author of White Fragility, claims to believe in accountability. DiAngelo used to list the "racial justice" organizations she donates to as part of her extensive "accountability statement," including a monthly "land rent" paid to the Native American tribe that used to occupy Seattle.
But when the Washington Free Beacon began contacting the organizations she listed as recipients of her largesse, DiAngelo scrubbed the site, removing their names and the dates of her giving from the public domain—a version of the page remains available through the Internet Archive after briefly being unavailable due to what the site said were technical issues. The page was edited again as recently as Friday, when DiAngelo wrote she would begin donating 15 percent of her after-tax income, "in cash and in-kind donations," starting next month—suggesting she had not previously, as the page exhorts, given a percentage of her income large enough that she could "feel it."
This about-face is odd for a woman who has made her career demanding white people not respond defensively in hard conversations. DiAngelo vaulted to superstardom upon the 2018 publication of her book, White Fragility, which argues that all whites are racist and any rejection of that fact is only further evidence of it. To address racism, DiAngelo argues, requires the sort of anti-bias instruction she is selling.
The nationwide racial outcry that has followed the killing of George Floyd has supercharged the Diversity and Inclusion industry, and DiAngelo may be its greatest success story. While she has likely made over $2 million from her book, the speaking circuit is where she is cleaning up. One of the speakers bureaus that represents her told the Free Beacon that a 60-90 minute keynote would run $30,000, a two-hour workshop $35,000, and a half-day event $40,000.
Even before the George Floyd protests reinvigorated demand for so-called anti-racist instruction, the New Yorker had dubbed DiAngelo "the country’s most visible expert in anti-bias training." But the eye-popping numbers underscore how she has turned her academic theories about white racism into a multimillion-dollar empire of anti-imperialism. She owns three homes and is an international jetsetter.
DiAngelo did not respond to multiple requests for comment for this article.
DiAngelo’s clients, according to her website, range from Amazon and the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation to Unilever and the YMCA. DiAngelo reportedly charges up to $15,000 per session—a March 2019 appearance, for example, cost the University of Kentucky $12,000, as well as a $5-a-minute phone-call fee. Recent virtual events run up to $175 a ticket. The eight to ten private events DiAngelo says she speaks at each month likely net her at least $1.5 million annually.
Her book, which made the New York Times bestseller list in its first week and currently occupies the number-two slot, has only added to her success. DiAngelo's publisher said it has sold 1.6 million copies, one million this year alone. Given a conservative 8 percent in royalties, that would mean the book has made DiAngelo over $2 million.
Such lucrative gigs put the white DiAngelo on par with several prominent black commentators on race. Boston University's Ibram X. Kendi, whose book has jockeyed with DiAngelo's on the bestseller list, charges $150 for tickets to public events and $25,000 for a one-hour presentation, his representatives told the Free Beacon. Former Atlantic writer Ta-Nehisi Coates has charged between $30,000 and $40,000 for public lectures.
DiAngelo has presented herself as a classic American rags-to-riches story, offering vivid details of a childhood spent in profound poverty. Those details are not always consistent—in a 2006 paper, for example, DiAngelo claims she "left home as a teenager and struggled to survive," seeing "no path out of poverty other than education." But in a recent New York Times interview, DiAngelo claimed to have run away from home but says she "didn’t get far," and she didn’t enroll in college until she was in her mid-30s. Neither of DiAngelo’s sisters responded to requests for comment.
Her path out of poverty did come through education: a B.A. from Seattle University, then an M.A. and Ph.D. from the University of Washington. The latter was collected under the tutelage of Professor James A. Banks, the "father" of multicultural education, and earned for a 300-page thesis on the "master discourses" of whiteness.
By the time DiAngelo landed an associate professorship at Westfield State University, outside of Springfield, Mass., she was entrenched in anti-bias training. As early as 2007, she co-taught a class with Darlene Flynn, a leading figure in Seattle's social justice community.
She may have seen opportunity in a growing industry. The Diversity and Inclusion business was thought to be worth $8 billion as of 2003; by 2005, 65 percent of big companies offered diversity training.
Demand has risen since, and she has reaped the benefits. Public records indicate she owns three homes, all bought before White Fragility was published: a four-bedroom bungalow and half of a duplex in Seattle (her daughter, nearing 40, occupies the latter), and a cabin in rural Washington, where DiAngelo and husband Jason Toews relax with friends who, at least on Toews's Instagram, appear to be exclusively white. Tax assessments put DiAngelo's cumulative housing wealth at roughly $1.6 million, in the vicinity of Coates's $2 million Brooklyn brownstone.
In the past three years, DiAngelo and Toews, who as of last September served as DiAngelo’s administrative assistant, have backpacked through Thailand, visited Romania, and toured South Africa.
DiAngelo’s wealth is jarring in part because of her criticisms of white privilege. It is also surprising given that available evidence suggests the anti-bias training she peddles does not work.
A review of nearly 1,000 studies of anti-bias tools found little evidence that they have any impact. In fact, recent studies suggest anti-bias training's primary effect may be to encourage discrimination: Firms with diversity training end up with fewer minorities in management, and field research finds that training both reinforces stereotypes and increases animosity against minority groups.
But DiAngelo’s concept of "white fragility" offers an answer to that academic evidence: The negative responses whites express when told they’re racist are simply evidence that they lack "racial stamina"—and indicate that more $40,000 anti-bias sessions are necessary.
Her advice to white people looking to "shift their thinking and alter their actions" is to engage in more self-education, particularly of the sort she sells. Doing so, she told NPR, "will be lifelong"—an effective way for an already wealthy woman to keep her clientele.
This sales pitch is working. White Fragility tops reading lists from corporations and prestigious universities. Reading groups from Washington, D.C., to South Euclid, Ohio, are discussing it. And the proceeds all flow to a woman who has made a career arguing that white people like her are inescapably, intolerably privileged—an injustice you can only remedy by buying her book.
https://freebeacon.com/culture/the-wages-of-woke-2/
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2020.07.25 18:24 thefeedbot redsteeze: RT @elianayjohnson: “But when the Washington Free Beacon began contacting the organizations she listed as recipients of her largesse, DiAngelo scrubbed the site, removing their names and the dates of her giving from the public domain,” via ⁦@CharlesFLehman⁩ ⁦- https://t.co/JBSjczRIZZ

redsteeze: RT @elianayjohnson: “But when the Washington Free Beacon began contacting the organizations she listed as recipients of her largesse, DiAngelo scrubbed the site, removing their names and the dates of her giving from the public domain,” via ⁦@CharlesFLehman⁩ ⁦- https://t.co/JBSjczRIZZ submitted by thefeedbot to TheTwitterFeed [link] [comments]


2019.12.20 04:39 Shadowthief3324 I’m pretty sure Disney has a gay prince

Hear me out...
Nico DiAngelo is the son of Hades, who is king of the underworld. That makes Nico a prince. Well, Nico is dating Will Solace. And Disney owns the Percy Jackson series.
There you guys go...I present to you Nico DiAngelo-Disney’s gay prince
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2019.07.17 04:23 jays1998 Where does the starting 5 of players Kendall Jenner has dated rank in the NBA?

Jenner has dated: Diangelo Russell, Jordan Clarkson, Ben Simmons, Kyle Kuzma, and Blake Griffin. That makes a starting 5 of:
PG: RUSSELL
SG: CLARKSON
SF: KUZMA
PF: SIMMONS
C: GRIFFIN
This starting 5 definitely has a ton of offensive firepower in Russell/Simmons/Kuzma/Griffin, but it looks like it will give up buckets faster their respective relationships ended. Regardless, I think they'd probably rank in the top 15 in the NBA in terms of starting lineups.
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2019.01.13 03:37 Mothirix I made a girl cry when she couldn't date a fictional character

I love Harry Potter, A song of ice and fire, Percy Jackson and all that jazz. But I am very aware that they are fictional stories. And I know I will never meet, let alone date, any of those fictional characters. Because its fiction.
This girl I met I guess could not distinguish between that.
When I was younger I went to this acting-art school. I was put in the teen class because I was on the cusp (I was like 12-13) and there was this girl in the glass with me (She was twelve). She LOOOOVED anime and Percy Jackson and all those fantasy/adventure preteen books that young teens like. And I liked them too except I was much more silent about my obsession with them. But I befriended her because it was nice to have friend that shared some of my interest.
Now when a bad thing happens to a character, readers are upset but its fiction so they aren't super depressed. But this girl WEPT. If you mentioned a bad thing that happened to Percy Jackson or Sirius Black or Ciel Phantomhive she would burst out into tears. It was really awkward and I would just being standing there trying to calm her down.
(Spoilers for the heros of olympus series btw)
Well one day we were doing this acting thing and her and I started talking about Percy Jackson. She was reading this spinoff of PJ called Hero's of olympus. Its also worth mentioning she had a huuuuge crush on the son of Hades, Nico DiAngelo and she heard rumors that he was gay. So, with her permission, I mentioned that the edgy, goth son of Hades is infact gay and I jokingly added that she will never date him now.
This caused the girl to burst out in tears and start sobbing. SOBBING. OVER A FICTIONAL GAY CHARACTER. The teacher took her outside to talk to her and I remember sitting there awkwardly as people wondered what happened.
Idk where she is. It would be interesting to see her again.
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2018.02.23 17:12 NicholasCajun Seven Seconds - Series Premiere Discussion

Premise: An African-American teenager is critically injured when he is hit by the car of an white officer (Beau Knapp), who runs from the scene and his superior officer, Mike DiAngelo (David Lyons) exacerbates things by trying to cover it up in the first season of the anthology crime drama from Veena Sud set in Jersey City, New Jersey and based on the 2013 Russian film, The Major.
Subreddit: Network: Premiere date: Metacritic:
/SevenSeconds Netflix February 23, 2018 68/100
Links:
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2015.07.23 18:32 CallinOutFromMidwest Yellow Fragility

AKA Why Asians Freak Out When They're Called Out About Race
In 2011 of the Year of Our Lord, Saint Robin DiAngelo came down from on high and published a little paper called White Fragility. What is White Fragility?
White people in North America live in a social environment that protects and insulates them from race-based stress. This insulated environment of racial protection builds white expectations for racial comfort while at the same time lowering the ability to tolerate racial stress, leading to what I refer to as White Fragility. White Fragility is a state in which even a minimum amount of racial stress becomes intolerable, triggering a range of defensive moves.
Y'all brothers have seen these defensive moves before:
"Stop being so angry!"
"You're just mad you can't get laid!"
"So what if White people are racist? Asians are racist too!"
"I don't know what you're talking about! This one Asian guy I know..."
And my personal favorite,
"If you don't like it, go back to your country!"
That shit always makes me laugh. How about y'all motherfuckers go back to Ireland?
Regardless, this shit ain't about White Fragility. We already know that, by and large, White people give zero fucks about really engaging in any sort of critical examination or self-reflection about their privilege. Why would they? But I wanted to focus on a larger problem, a problem that has created far more barriers and hurdles towards true equality than White Supremacy.
That problem is Yellow Fragility.
What is Yellow Fragility? Yellow Fragility is a frontal lobotomy. It is the blind spot in y'all brains when it comes to anti-Asian racism. You're able to see and recognize racism when it comes to other POC, but are completely unable to withstand or participate in any sort of conversation about the discrimination faced by Asians without engaging in victim-blaming, tone policing, or popping a Xanax to cope with the anxiety. Defensive maneuvers include shit like agreeing with offensive stereotypes (they call this "laughing it off", rofl), telling other Asians they need to just "try harder" (like the railroad workers), and protesting that most White people aren't really racist (while panting behind them like a pet poodle).
To witness Yellow Fragility in action, just look at Ken Jeong at the Espys. Holy shit, what a house chink.
Any time you see anti-Asian racism reported in the news or published in a journal, you can always count on these overly delicate kamikaze pilots to throw themselves under the bus by proclaiming that it is all OUR fault for experiencing racism. We just didn't try hard enough or our parents were too strict. Lmao.
Some 2,000 Chinese railroad workers, tired of being whipped as slaves (despite the Emancipation Proclamation of 1863), organize a peaceful and orderly strike, walking off their jobs in the Sierras. They politely present a list of demands to the their employers. The Central Pacific cuts off their food supply, effectively starving them back to work, since they are denied any transportation to leave the area.
About one in ten Chinese workers died building the railroads—1,756 miles of track were laid at the cost of 1.7 Chinese deaths per mile—leaving about 12,000 Chinese still employed at this point.
Silly Chinese laborers, didn't you know you just had to try harder? It's not White people's fault that y'all just keeled over, y'all should've just... LIFTED... MOARRRRRR ;)
Now, my girl Robin was interviewed by Alternet back in March about the idea of White Fragility. Transcript can be found here. I thought it'd be interesting to pick out a few key excerpts, and ask y'all if anything sounds familiar, especially when it comes to talking to other Asians about racism. It's a fun little exercise, I promise you :) Let's begin:
Sam Adler-Bell: How did you come to write about "white fragility"?
Robin DiAngelo: To be honest, I wanted to take it on because it’s a frustrating dynamic that I encounter a lot. I don’t have a lot of patience for it. And I wanted to put a mirror to it.
I do atypical work for a white person, which is that I lead primarily white audiences in discussions on race every day, in workshops all over the country. That has allowed me to observe very predictable patterns. And one of those patterns is this inability to tolerate any kind of challenge to our racial reality. We shut down or lash out or in whatever way possible block any reflection from taking place.
Hmm, sound familiar? Sound like a lot of discussions we've had with self-loathing sisters and truly loathsome brothers? "Ohhhhh, stahpppp, it's not so baaaaaad..." Just shut the fuck up, house chink.
Of course, it functions as means of resistance, but I think it’s also useful to think about it as fragility, as inability to handle the stress of conversations about race and racism
Sometimes it’s strategic, a very intentional push back and rebuttal. But a lot of the time, the person simply cannot function. They regress into an emotional state that prevents anybody from moving forward.
LMFAO, sound anything like some of our other subs like /asianamerican or /asiantwox? Let's not talk about White racism towards Asian guys. In fact, talking about it constitutes hate! I love sister tamallamaluv to death, but she recently called this forum a "hate sub". Huh. Who, exactly, are we hating on, girl? White people? If hating White Supremacy/racism constitutes us being a "hate sub", then /blackfellas and /blackladies must straight up be American History X. Hell, they even created a sub called /OldWhiteManHate.
For white people, their identities rest on the idea of racism as about good or bad people, about moral or immoral singular acts, and if we’re good, moral people we can’t be racist – we don’t engage in those acts. This is one of the most effective adaptations of racism over time—that we can think of racism as only something that individuals either are or are not “doing.”
YES. UNDERSTAND THAT RACISM DOES NOT HAVE TO BE ACTIVE. NOBODY HAS TO CALL YOU JACKIE CHAN FOR YOU TO EXPERIENCE RACISM.
Anyone else sick of drooling Uncle Chans who giddyup in here Gangnam Style to remind us all that "Well, I've personally never experienced any racism!" Wrong. By simply being born in America, you've experienced racism. It's everywhere, it's all around you, Force choking the fucking life out of your braindead carcass. Anti-Asian racism is INSTITUTIONAL.
There is no more damning indictment of the culture and institutions of this country than the fact that a POC who merely lives next to White people internalizes both White fragility and racism.
In large part, white fragility—the defensiveness, the fear of conflict—is rooted in this good/bad binary. If you call someone out, they think to themselves, “What you just said was that I am a bad person, and that is intolerable to me.” It’s a deep challenge to the core of our identity as good, moral people.
Or: "What you just said was that my friend/boyfriend is a bad person, and that is intolerable to me."
Lemme tell y'all somethin. People who are otherwise good, moral, upstanding citizens and neighbors, can still be racist as shit. I'm tired of hearing Uncle Chans/Anna Lus apologize for their boys/boyfriends just because they're nice, helpful, chill people who just happen to have Dylan Roof attitudes towards POC. Y'all really ain't helping. I don't care if y'all broke a BFF heart locket in two and carry the pieces individually, fuck your man and fuck you if y'all even remotely believe any of the Asian stereotypes to have a "grain of truth". You're no different from the kindly old German people during the Third Reich.
We know it, but we can never admit it. It creates this kind of dangerous internal stew that gets enacted externally in our interactions with people of color, and is crazy-making for people of color. We have set the world up to preserve that internal sense of superiority and also resist challenges to it. All while denying that anything is going on and insisting that race is meaningless to us.
Heed this shit brothers and sisters. As the Alvarez study showed, "color-blindness" does not exist, only "blindness". Stop playing Daredevil, and WAKE THE FUCK UP.
First of all, whites often confuse comfort with safety. We say we don’t feel safe, when what we mean is that we don’t feel comfortable.
I'm looking at YOU, /asiantwox.
we should be suspicious of our feelings in these interactions. There’s no such thing as pure feeling. You have a feeling because you’ve filtered the experience through a particular lens. The feeling is the outcome. It probably feels natural, but of course it’s shaped by what you believe.
All self-hating Anna Lus everywhere, FUCK YOUR PREFERENCES.
SAB: There’s also the issue of "tone-policing" here, right?
RD: Yes. One of the things I try to work with white people on is letting go of our criteria about how people of color give us feedback. We have to build our stamina to just be humble and bear witness to the pain we’ve caused.
In my workshops, one of the things I like to ask white people is, “What are the rules for how people of color should give us feedback about our racism? What are the rules, where did you get them, and whom do they serve?” Usually those questions alone make the point.
Yeah, /asianamerican, what's with all the goddamn rules? What's with all the fucking tone policing? Where did you get these rules about how Asian men need to express their frustration at racism, and WHO THE FUCK DO THOSE RULES SERVE?
It’s like if you’re standing on my head and I say, “Get off my head,” and you respond, “Well, you need to tell me nicely.” I’d be like, “No. Fuck you. Get off my fucking head.”
GET OFF MY FUCKING HEAD.
In the course of my work, I’ve had many people of color give me feedback in ways that might be perceived as intense or emotional or angry. And on one level, it’s personal—I did do that thing that triggered the response, but at the same time it isn’t only personal. I represent a lifetime of people that have hurt them in the same way that I just did.
ARE YOU READING THIS SHIT, ASIAN SISTERS?
When I’m doing a workshop, I’ll often ask the people of color in the room, somewhat facetiously, “How often have you given white people feedback about our inevitable and often unconscious racist patterns and had that go well for you?” And they laugh.
Because it just doesn’t go well. And so one time I asked, “What would your daily life be like if you could just simply give us feedback, have us receive it graciously, reflect on it and work to change the behavior? What would your life be like?”
And this one man of color looked at me and said, “It would be revolutionary.”
Let me pause here for a second.
This shit is important.
Consider what the fuck this brave brotha just said.
If we were able to OPENLY EXPRESS and have society acknowledge our sentiments about anti-Asian racism, about the bullying, about the poverty, about the housing discrimination, about the glass ceiling, about the unequal pay, about the dating disparity, about anti-Asian education policies, about our fucked up media representation, about the gaslighting, the lies, and the whitewashed revisions of our history... what did he say would happen?
. .. ... A REVOLUTION.
Think on that, brothers. Out.
Related Readings:
Wtf is an Uncle Chan?
A Message From a House Chink
In A Cage Made of Bamboo
Happy Birthday America
Uh Huh, You Know What It Is, Black and Yellow
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